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Black Walnut Leaves 100 g, 50 g, 25 g

$7.99$16.99

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Black Walnut Leaves  100 g ($16.99), 50 g ($10.99), 25 g ($7.99)

Benefits
During the last century, walnut leaf has been known as one of the “most mild and efficacious laxatives” available. Chinese medicine uses it to treat asthma, beriberi, erectile dysfunction (ED), and constipation. Ayurvedic medicine uses it for rheumatic complaints. The oil of the seeds was used for tapeworm but was reported to have aphrodisiac effects as well as to be useful for dysentery and colic. It has been used as a blood purifier. White walnut also is used in homeopathy as a treatment for liver disorders and intestinal sickness.

Another species of walnut, the black walnut (J. nigra), has been used to treat athlete’s foot and parasitic infections. Black walnut bark helps relieve constipation and is useful against fungal and parasitic infections. It is used to expel, rather than kill, worms during the normal course of laxative-induced cleansing of the body. Used externally, black walnut is beneficial for eczema, herpes, psoriasis, and skin parasites. It has been shown to exhibit anticancer properties due to the acids and alkaloids it contains. However, other substances such as juglone (a chemical) found in the walnut hulls have been shown to have mutagenic action, and topical use of the hulls has been linked to cancer of the lips and tongue.

The German Commission E has approved walnut leaf for mild, superficial inflammation of the skin and excessive perspiration, especially of the hands and feet.

Acne and eczema. Walnut leaves contain astringent tannins. These tannins cross-link skin cells, making them less impermeable to infectious microorganisms, especially fungi. Walnut leaves contain two antibacterial agents, walnut essential oil and juglone, which act directly on infectious microorganisms.

Excessive sweating. Walnut leaf washes “shrink” the sweat glands, possibly reducing perspiration. The herb’s tannins cause proteins in the cells lining the sweat glands to cross-link, effectively forming a barrier to the excretion of sweat.

Considerations for Use
Walnut leaf teas can be made into baths, compresses, and skin washes. This herb product is more likely to be obtained from herb shops and other herb suppliers. There are many products that are made with walnut hulls combined with other herbs in tinctures for use as a harsh laxative. You should not use walnut hulls instead of walnut leaf for the conditions discussed above.

 

Botanical names: Juglans nigra, Juglans regia (Juglandaceae [walnut] family)
Also known as: black walnut, Caucasian walnut, Circassian walnut, white walnut, Carya, Walnoot, Jupiter’s nuts
English: Black Walnut Leaves
Habitat: North America
Origin: Albania
Harvested: Cultivated
Parts Used: Leaves

General Information:
Walnut trees are native to the dry temperate zones of western Asia, China, India, and the southwestern United States. The tree most often used in herbal medicine, the species native to western Asia, also is cultivated for commercial walnut production in Europe and the United States. The leaves are gathered in spring and summer and dried for medicinal purposes.

Walnut leaves have been used in herbal medicine for thousands of years. The Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder reported the cultivation of walnut trees in the first century, the trees having reached Rome from the Middle East. The Latin name of the tree is derived from reference to the god Jupiter; Juglans is derived from combining the name Jupiter with glans (acorn), meaning “Jupiter’s nuts.” The famed seventeenth-century English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper combined walnut leaf with honey, onion, and salt to draw out venom from the bites of snakes and spiders.

Juglans nigra, the eastern black walnut, is a species of deciduous tree in the walnut family. A large tree that may grow to 120 feet, 6-12-inch lance-shaped leaves. Black Walnut Hull or Juglans Nigra is, just as it sounds, the hull of the black walnut tree. The Black Walnut tree grows in the eastern US and parts of Canada, and while easy to grow and it is a beautiful shade tree. Black Walnut has been used in herbal medicine for thousands of years.

The leaves are compound and alternately arranged on the stem. They are 25-50 cm long, typically even-pinnate but there is heavy variation among the leaves. The stems have 15-20 leaflets, with the largest leaflets located in the center, 8-10 cm long and 2-3 cm broad. The leaflets have a rounded base and a long pointed (acuminate) tip as well as having a serrated edge. The leaves are overall dark green in color and are typically hairy on the underside. Fruit Ripens during the autumn into a fruit (nut) with a brownish-green, semi fleshy husk, and a brown, corrugated nut. The whole fruit, including the husk, falls in October or November, the seed is relatively small and very hard. The immature fruits are round, green orbs with fleshy green outer husks that dry into very hard dark-brown nuts Because of its dark color, the outer hull is also used as a dye and was used in brown hair dye until the early 1900s.

Most parts of the tree, including leaves, stems, and fruit husks have a very characteristic pungent or spicy odor. This odor is lacking in the nut itself.

Walnut trees are native to the dry temperate zones of western Asia, China, India, and the southwestern United States. The tree most often used in herbal medicine, the species native to western Asia, also is cultivated for commercial walnut production in Europe and the United States. The leaves are gathered in spring and summer and dried for medicinal purposes.

Walnut leaves have been used in herbal medicine for thousands of years. The Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder reported the cultivation of walnut trees in the first century, the trees having reached Rome from the Middle East. The Latin name of the tree is derived from reference to the god Jupiter; Juglans is derived from combining the name Jupiter with glans (acorn), meaning “Jupiter’s nuts.” The famed seventeenth-century English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper combined walnut leaf with honey, onion, and salt to draw out venom from the bites of snakes and spiders.

How to use:
Hot Infusion:
The basic method for dried herbs and flower is, take 2-3 tablespoons of dried herb in a cup or teapot Pour hot water over it and cover it with lid for 10-30 minutes. Hot water is needed to draw out the antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, flavonoids and volatile oils from the botanicals. Strain and squeeze out as much as liquid as possible and enjoy!

Tips:
You can sweeten your herbal tea with a bit of honey, natural fruit juice, stevia leaves powder and or licorice root powder You can make ice cubes or pops by freezing tea in ice trays or pop molds.

Weight 0.25 lbs
Size

25 g, 50 g, 100 g

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